2021-2022 Cohort

Darin Borgstadter

Darin Borgstadter

Hello, my name I Darin Borgstadter. I am the manager of the Oregon 4-H Center in Salem, Oregon. I grew up in Ellsworth, Kansas, graduating with a Bachelor of Science degree from Kansas State University. I learned that I enjoyed leadership, the challenges it presents, and problem solving skills it develops. Many of my first jobs were in areas that allowed me to grow into leadership positions quickly. In 1994 I joined the YMCA of Seattle and started a journey that would eventually lead to me having a 22-year career with that organization. Over the years I moved from Seattle, to San Diego, and then to Boise, Idaho. I worked my way up from dishwasher to Executive Director. At the YMCA I learned many things while I supervised over 150 people in various roles throughout the operation. In 2017 I fulfilled a lifelong dream of living in Oregon by joining the faculty at Oregon State University. I am lucky enough to live in a beautiful place and enjoy the twists and turns of running an organization such as the 4-H Center. My family consists of my wife Holly, my two sons Stetson and Fred, Stetson’s wife Haley and the most recent additions of our two grandchildren Sophie and Shane. All of who bring me much joy and happiness.


Caplan

Shannon Caplan

Shannon is a first-generation college graduate who prioritizes lifelong learning through both formal and informal education. She earned a B.A. in Anthropology at Sonoma State University, an M.A. in Anthropology at Northern Arizona University, and a Ph.D. in Applied Anthropology at Oregon State University, taking classes across many disciplines along the way due to a dedicated interest in transdisciplinary work. She has worked with community-based grassroots organizations, philanthropic foundations, local and state governments, federal agencies, industry, and tribal cultural organizations. Shannon joined OSU Extension as a graduate employee in 2014 and is currently an Assistant Professor of Practice affiliated with Open Campus-Rural Communities Explorer and SNAP-Ed. She enjoys unraveling the stories told by numbers to find all the nuances that are missing, and the importance of varied lived experiences to fill in those gaps. She constantly asked her parents “why” as a toddler and seemingly never stopped. When not pondering the big and little questions, Shannon likes video games, bar trivia, spending time with her human and non-human family, reading, and too much television.


Sam Clayburn

Samantha, aka Sam, Clayburn was born and raised in Myrtle Point OR and graduated from Western Oregon University with a Bachelor of Science degree in Health Education in 2000. She worked in the medical field for 14 years as an insurance biller, HIPAA office and office manager. She came to work at Coos County OSU Extension in 2014 as an office specialist before becoming the Educational Program Assistant II/Volunteer Coordinator for the Master Gardener and Master Food Preserver programs in 2015. Sam and her husband Justin have been married 20 years and have two sons Brayden and Logan as well as two dogs (Sassy and Thor) and a cat named DUII. In her spare time, she likes to run, bike, hike and camp with her family. She is also a city councilor in her hometown of Myrtle Point.


Ali Duerfeldt (She / her / hers)

Ali Duerfeldt is the assistant director of marketing for Oregon State University Ecampus. In this role, she serves as a creative strategist, digital brand manager and marketing professional, collaborating with passionate people to create innovative and measurable marketing strategies. Ali is passionate about and engaged in anti-racist work and examining and improving marketing practices through the lens of diversity, equity and inclusion.  Ali earned a Bachelor’s of Arts in Public Relations from Gonzaga University and a Master’s of Education in College Student Services Administration from Oregon State University.


Bryan Endress

Bryan Endress is based in La Grande, Oregon and serves as the Rangeland Sciences Program Lead within the Department of Animal and Rangeland Sciences. His research focuses on applied ecology, ecological restoration, and natural resource management. Research is highly collaborative, and conducted in partnership with a wide range of stakeholders, including landowners, resource users, government agencies, tribes, non-governmental organizations, and universities both in the United States and abroad. Bryan’s work lies at the interface of basic and applied science and advances ecological principles while providing insight for sustainable use, stewardship, management, and restoration. He has published over 30 scientific publications and generated over $2.7 million in grant support. Prior to joining Oregon State University, Bryan served as the Director of Applied Plant Ecology for the Zoological Society of San Diego for seven years, where he led a global conservation and research program. He holds a BA in Biology from Luther College, a MS in Forestry from the University of Illinois and a PhD from Miami University in Botany.


Kym Hamann

Kym Hamann has worked with OSU Extension for two years as the office specialist in Tillamook County. She grew up in Minnesota but has called Oregon and Tillamook County specifically, home for over twenty years.


Laurie

Laurie Kirkner

Laurie (she/her/hers) joined the OSU community in late 2019 as assistant director in the Course Development and Training unit of Ecampus. Her work focuses on online and hybrid course design and development, team development, process improvement, creativity, and design thinking. Laurie hails from the midwest, where she earned a BA in English and minored in Computer Applications and Programming from the University of Notre Dame. During the twelve years she taught in the community college system, she developed an interest in good instructional design and online learning. An online learner herself, Laurie received an MS in Systems Design and Analysis from Indiana University. Prior to arriving in Oregon’s heart of the valley, she spent many years building programs and doing instructional design work with faculty at both a small, private research University, and at one of the largest community colleges in the country. Education and helping others advance are sources of great inspiration and passion. 


Lauren Kraemer

Lauren Kraemer is an Associate Professor of Practice in the College of Public Health and Human Sciences with Oregon State University Extension Service. Lauren’s research and programming interests include chronic disease prevention and health promotion through interventions in nutrition and physical activity, as well as the development of policies, systems, and environmental shifts to enhance health equity and address social determinants of health. Lauren has held a number of roles on boards, committees, and coalitions at the local and regional level. She currently serves as a steering committee member for the regional Columbia Gorge Food Security Coalition, the Migrant and Seasonal Farm Worker Taskforce, and chairs the Healthy Active Hood River County Coalition. She also participates in the Gorge Health Equity Coalition and participates in regional and statewide childcare access task forces. Lauren directs a statewide, community-based strength training program for older adults called StrongPeople. In these roles, Lauren gets to work at the intersection of food systems, food security, aging, and health equity. This blends her work with the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Education that she manages for the Mid-Columbia region with numerous collaborative projects across sectors with many community partners. She has been teaching food preservation and disaster preparedness education courses for over a decade in the Columbia River Gorge and is trained as a Community Emergency Response Team volunteer. Lauren is also part of a team that developed an online course called Preparing for the Cascadia Subduction Zone Event, which teaches participants how to prepare for and recover from the pending Cascadia Subduction Zone earthquake. Lauren has also co-developed six publications in a series called “Survival Basics” that covers water, food, sanitation and hygiene, stress, and preparedness kits. Lauren’s passions are making connections, creativity, and empowering others. Lauren is an avid gardener, home cook, outdoor enthusiast, and novice ukulele player. She has two sons who she brings into the kitchen and the garden as much as she can so they can learn to grow and prepare food on their own someday.


Chrissy Lucas

Chrissy Lucas is an Outreach Program Coordinator for Groundwater Protection Education in the Willamette Valley. In addition to her work with domestic well and septic system users, she also works as a coordinator for the Center for Small Farms and Community Food Systems Small Farms Program Annual Conference, as well as the maintenance and production of the associated websites and newsletter. Chrissy holds a B.S. from OSU in Animal Sciences with a concentration in Pre-Veterinary Medicine and a minor in Chemistry. After taking an extra year of general agriculture courses and beginning a graduate program to become a high-school agriculture teacher, she began working as a student worker for Sea Grant Extension. She was immediately hooked and fell in love with the mission and community based work of extension. In 2005, she joined the Benton County office as an Education Program Assistant for Forestry, Youth Natural Resource Education, and Small Farms programs. After 12 years (and many revised job descriptions), she was promoted to an Outreach Program Coordinator in 2017. Her programming is primarily funded through grants she has written and tax service district funding from counties that have requested her expertise. Currently, she is working on a grant funded project to determine if her navigator style domestic well safety programming would be feasible to scale up to provide this education statewide, and if effective share the model with other states that do not have effective domestic well education programs.


Nat Macias

In the past year running Juntos in Tillamook County, Natalie Macias has run workshops with middle school and High school families with the local school districts. Nat began students’ clubs at two high schools and the local community college where students were able to participate in culturally relevant activities and holidays, these included Kuna people of Panamá and Molas, papel picado and México, La Historia del Cinco de Mayo, Latinas importantes- Women’s history month, Cinco de Mayo, and Children’s Day. Tillamook county Juntos offered a summer camp for high school students. The summer camp, Juntos Afuera, is an immersive outdoor camp for Latinx students to create an inclusive and safe space to learn and celebrate out culture. This was also another opportunity where students provided leadership development skills, Career explorations, cultural family nights, outdoor exploration, and an opportunity to share with the county commissioners. Nat continues her work facilitating workshops, clubs, family nights and summer camps in Tillamook County and hopes to provide more opportunities for the Latinx community with community partners.


Amber

Amber Moore

I am currently serving at the Extension Soil Fertility Specialist with Oregon State University, and I have been in this position since 2017. I was promoted from Assistant Professor to the Associate Professor rank in 2020. The focus of my position is to conduct applied research and to develop nutrient and lime recommendations that improve nutrient use efficiency by large acreage crops grown in Oregon. The crops of primary focus are on grass grown for seed, cereals, and potatoes, with a secondary focus on minor crops (other seed crops, peppermint, forages, vegetables, berries, Christmas trees, etc.). My research program is focused on developing soil fertility research efforts that are statistically sound and address current soil fertility needs in Oregon large acreage field crops. Research interests include fertilizer response, nitrogen mineralization, acidification caused by nitrogen fertilizers, lime response, plant nutrient uptake, and soil nutrient dynamics.


Lloyd

Lloyd Nackley

I am a production horticulturalist who brings a systems approach to nursery and greenhouse management research and extension. Broadly, I am is interested in how natural and controlled environments impact plant growth and development; and subsequently how these interactions influence management decisions, and societies’ ability to sustain essential ecosystem goods and services. I received his B.S. Environmental Horticulture, from California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo, and Ph.D. in Plant Ecology from the University of Washington; joined OSU after two post-doctoral research positions. First at the University of Cape Town, South Africa, and second at the University of California Cooperative Extension, Plant Sciences Department, Davis, CA.


Luisa

Dr. Luisa Santamaria

Dr. Luisa Santamaria is an Associate Professor – Extension Plant Pathologist, located at the North Willamette Research & Extension Center in Aurora. She received a BS in Biological Sciences at the Pontifical Catholic University in Ecuador, an MS in Horticulture, and a Ph.D. in Plant Pathology, both at the University of Delaware. In her current position, Luisa has implemented a unique bilingual education program that supports the nursery industry and other agriculture commodities to promote the production of healthy plants, food safety, and good agricultural practices. She offers both on-site consulting and bilingual education aimed at preventing the introduction and spread of threatening plant diseases. Her applied research focuses on the management of diseases in ornamental and nursery crops, especially those caused by soil-borne pathogens. She has established collaborations across the country and is currently involved with a multi-million-dollar grant researching nationwide boxwood blight management. Luisa is a member of the Oregon Board of Agriculture, currently serving a second term.


Sagar

Dr. Vidyasagar Sathuvalli

Dr. Vidyasagar Sathuvalli is an Associate Professor of Potato Breeding and Genetics in the College of Agricultural Sciences, Oregon State University, USA. Dr. Sathuvalli earned his Bachelor’s in Horticulture from Tamil Nadu Agricultural University and his Master’s and PhD from Oregon State University with specialization in Plant Breeding and Genetics. Dr. Sathuvalli’s nine years as faculty in Department of Crop and Soil Science have been characterized by his leadership, creativity, collaboration and his sustained record of scholarly outputs and service to the potato industry and the University. Dr. Sathuvalli is a sought-after speaker whose contributions extend far beyond the USA. His highly successful potato breeding and variety development program seeks to find genetic and genomic solutions to existing and emerging disease problems in potato production, ensuring that sustainable production of this globally important source of nutrients and calories continues. During his tenure he has released nine potato varieties as the lead breeder and contributed to six additional varieties as a Tri-state partner.


Joe

Joe Schaffer

Joe is the Assistant Director of Student Services for Ecampus since July 2020, supporting distance students from orientation through completion. Prior to Ecampus, he worked in campus recreation for 14 years at San Diego State and Oregon State, focusing on student development and programming. Joe is currently a Ph.D. student in Adult & Higher Education at OSU and completing his 200-hour yoga teacher training in vinyasa power yoga. In his spare time, Joe plays golf, trivia, and coaches high school basketball.


Tomasino

Elizabeth Tomasino

Dr. Elizabeth Tomasino is an Associate Professor of enology at Oregon State University and a core member of the Oregon Wine Research Institute including management of the winemaker sensory panel. Elizabeth’s Ph.D. in Oenology was earned from Lincoln University in New Zealand and incorporated components of microbiology, winemaking, sensory science, chemistry and food science. Her knowledge of wine was expanded through multiple industry experiences with E & J Gallo, Yalumba Winery, Robert Mondavi Winery, Giesen Wine Estates, and Pernod Ricard NZ. These experiences have helped fuel her interest in applied wine research. Elizabeth’s current research program is at the interface of wine chemistry and sensory and she integrates her research findings into her undergraduate and graduate teaching program. Of particular interest, she links chemical compounds to sensory perception, exploring the many interactions that occur. Projects include the impact of chiral terpenes in aromatic white wines to aroma perception and determining the causes of fruity aromas in wine using fuzzy set qualitative comparative analysis (fsQCA). She is also uses advanced chemical analysis to differentiate and characterize Pinot noir wines from the sub-AVAs of the Willamette Valley. New projects are investigating the impact of norisoprenoids to Pinot noir, determining how lipids define mouthfeel in Pinot Noir, and developing predictive models for tropical fruit aromas in white wine and unraveling the many issue surrounding grape smoke exposure and smoke taint in in wine. She is always looking for new ideas and collaborations and welcomes the chance to discuss and enjoy wine!


Brittany

Brittany Williams

My passion for public service began during my childhood in Southern Oregon; with my personal and professional development occurring through my involvement in 4-H and FFA. My relationship with Oregon State University Extension began with those 4-H club meetings in elementary school, mentorship in high school, jobs in college ranging from the Klamath County Experiment Station to The National 4-H Council in Washington, D.C., and currently working as an educator in Lincoln County I have always found my way back to extension. Focused on increased accessibility and equity, I dedicated my early career to systematic instruction and serving vulnerable populations. More recently, I have found myself moving towards work with the spirit of furthering equity and inclusion on community levels through my work with the Oregon Health Authority. My proudest achievements center around my opportunities to give back to the programs that helped me launch my passions early on in my life. By having the opportunity to mentor youth on a local as well as global scale I have found what Theodore Roosevelt says is far and away the best prize that life offers.